Andy on Twitter

  • The great thing about Twitter is being a able to have chats with my President. All one way but chats just the same. He's in Sicily!,
  • Peter Farrell is so impressive. Such an amazing Aussie brand and product. Solving real issues. Sleep disorders are a disease.,
  • As much as I complain about airlines huge thanks to for great service on my epic SYD-LAX-AUS-SFO-SJC-LAX-SYD-ADL trip,
  • So proud of the RL team. Amazing achievement. ,
  • Just finishing preso on Mobile experience has by far the worst airline mobile app I've ever reviewed. Shocking. @epicfail,
  • Ultimate in bank branding. Mega Bank. All they need to do is add evil. ,
  • What I Learned From Increasing My Prices - ExtendsLogic ,
  • On marketing workflows... ,
  • So love the story of Ted Kooser... ,
  • ,
  • So much . Going to miss you bro'. ,
  • The ageist conceit that younger workers have more energy | ,
  • Apple Pay is useless. Works less than 50% of time in taxis. Google Pay is 100% great. No bank should be supporting AP. ,
  • Super proud of presenting at YouTube brand camp. So good.,
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150 Relationships

So how many relationships can you maintain – and for how long can you maintain them without face-to-face contact. 150 and six are the numbers. The Dunbar Numbers:

For Dunbar, there’s a simple explanation for this: In the same way that human beings can’t breathe underwater or run the 100-meter dash in 2.5 seconds or see microwaves with the naked eye, most cannot maintain many more than 150 meaningful relationships. Cognitively, we’re just not built for it. As with any human trait, there are outliers in either direction—shut-ins on the one hand, Bill Clinton on the other. But in general, once a group grows larger than 150, its members begin to lose their sense of connection. We live on an increasingly urban, crowded planet, but we have Stone Age social capabilities. “The figure of 150 seems to represent the maximum number of individuals with whom we can have a genuinely social relationship, the kind of relationship that goes with knowing who they are and how they relate to us,” Dunbar has written. “Putting it another way, it’s the number of people you would not feel embarrassed about joining uninvited for a drink if you happened to bump into them in a bar.”

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