Andy on Twitter

  • Publicis prioritizing investment is super smart. Nothing to be gained from investing in Cannes. Way over priced ,
  • Cannes this year is both shallow and disappointing. Some ok content but overly commercial and no CMO agenda ,
  • Shares in Cannes Lions' owner fall as Publicis pulls out and WPP voices doubts ,
  • All marketing arcs lead to membership. @Cannes_Lions,
  • Sharing = currency of communications. The system (social media) carries the currency and enables transactions . @Cannes_Lions,
  • Better never stops @Cannes_Lions,
  • Love the power of great brands + great artists + great institutions being drawn together by the artist ,
  • Yup ,
  • Unification of Unilever marketing org means better control over assets - less duplication/volume and more localization @Cannes_Lions,
  • Keith makes a fair point on reach - is about reaching those you haven't reached. @Cannes_Lions,
  • Creativity is last source of competitive advantage. Maybe... ,
  • Unstereotyped ads perform 25% better. a convenient number? but just the same a powerful point if even 5% better. @keithweed,
  • Brand safety and suitability go hand in hand. Some progress made but way to go. @keithweed,
  • Time to tackle the bots. Rip the ad fraud out. No such thing as cheap media. @Cannes_Lions,
  • Must count 100% of pixels as a view. Not 50% and not less. Need for 3rd party verification @Cannes_Lions,
  • Learned

Aeon

Another great new digital magazine. Well worth a look.

And if you are into philosophy and the like – this article on Alan Watts is brilliant. As the story goes:

He was, if not the earliest, then certainly the foremost translator of Eastern philosophical ideas to the West. In some ways, his interpretations were radical — for instance, he dismissed the core Zen idea of zazen(which meant spending hours seated in contemplative meditation) as unnecessary. ‘A cat sits until it is tired of sitting, then gets up, stretches, and walks away,’ was his forgiving interpretation of zazen. Slightly less forgiving was his comment on Western Zen enthusiasts, whom he mocked as ‘The uptight school … who seem to believe that Zen is essentially sitting on your ass for interminable hours.’ It was a great relief to read this for someone like me, who found the idea of excessive meditation as unhealthy as the idea of excessive masturbation.

Watts also rejected the conventional ideas of reincarnation and the popular understanding of karma as a system of rewards and punishments carried out, lifetime after lifetime. It was this radical approach that made his ideas so fresh — he had no time for received wisdom, even from those who claimed to know Zen inside out.

Many Zen ideas have become debased into ‘new age’ philosophy, basely transmuted into wishful thinking, quasi-religious mumbo jumbo and the narcissistic fantasies of the ‘me generation’. But before the beatniks and the hippies got hold of it, Zen philosophy, as described by Watts, was hard-edged, practical, logical and, in some ways, oddly English in tone, as it had deep strands of scepticism and humour. (You’ll never see Christian saints laughing. But most of the great sages of Zen have smiles on their faces, as does Buddha.)

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