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  • This is more a guide on how to not allocate your spend... 8 Things You Should Know About CMO Spend from Gartner is… ,
  • Great read on the Skimm. Wonder how many marketers are able to comprehend the reach and power of newsletters in the… ,
  • Why it is so important not to discount the power of so called traditional media. Digital and print are one. Journal… ,
  • You really can't make this stuff up. Truly epic brand nonsense. ,
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  • Seems like being onside no longer matters in rugby @AllBlacks,
  • It’s like a mix of rugby and on field lecture. Wonder if they will actually play between resets and penalties. Yawn. @AllBlacks,
  • While I wouldn't put Cheika in the same camp as any of these great coaches, Hansen makes a huge point as applicable… ,
  • If you were looking to create a community within a site - conversations etc.. Which software would you use?,
  • As must read for any marketer. Mark Ritson: 10 lessons all marketers should take from Direct Line’s brand strategy ,
  • Great read... 21 Lessons From Jeff Bezos' Annual Letters To Shareholders - CB Insights Research ,
  • customer satisfaction survey fatigue ,
  • great post from John on how algorithms erode trust and love. ,
  • So the lounge in LA has a dining room but you can only access it if you are going to certain locations… ,
  • So Brilliant.... Banksy painting sells for $1.9 million then self-destructs ,
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DeLinkification

All those links can be very distracting. Nick gets at this point very clearly:

The link is, in a way, a technologically advanced form of a footnote. It’s also, distraction-wise, a more violent form of a footnote. Where a footnote gives your brain a gentle nudge, the link gives it a yank. What’s good about a link – its propulsive force – is also what’s bad about it.

I don’t want to overstate the cognitive penalty produced by the hyperlink (or understate the link’s allure and usefulness), but the penalty seems to be real, and we should be aware of it. In The Shallows, I examine the hyperlink as just one element among many – including multimedia, interruptions, multitasking, jerky eye movements, divided attention, extraneous decision making, even social anxiety – that tend to promote hurried, distracted, and superficial thinking online. To understand the effects of the Web on our minds, you have to consider the cumulative effects of all these features rather than just the effects of any one individually.

You can read more here. And some more below. Lets put links at the end.

Salon review

Neuorethics at the Core post

Standage’s tweeted chortle

The Shallows site

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