Andy on Twitter

  • Embarrassed to be an American. Thrilled to be a Kiwi. It's not complete but a start. ,
  • Peeps, looking for a great agency/freelancer in Sydney with deep skills - build campaigns, edms etc in Pardot. Help!,
  • Disagree with this... myopic digital thinking. Miss by Kraft was underinvesting in brand and in some markets sellin… ,
  • Epic morning ,
  • Stunning Queenstown ,
  • Never gets old this view. Always changing with the light and seasons. ,
  • This is a maddening feature of Spotify and one of those moments of dissatisfaction that drives switching. Postal A… ,
  • A really good read... To often I see the value of data as a defensable advantage overstated... The Empty Promise of… ,
  • Brilliant... Choir! Choir! Choir! Epic! Nights: David Byrne + NYC sing HEROES via @YouTube,
  • Good move ... Westpac turns on AI chatbot ,
  • Paul is doing a great job of unpacking marketing trends and news. Worth a read if you are a marketer ,
  • Great read. Underscores how innovation happens in fast moving innovators is so radically different that incumbents.… ,
  • When landing in LAX and getting to terminal takes the equivalent of 70% of the flying time to LAX. Really… ,
  • The quality of questions matters... Good read... ,
  • Clearly courts have no concept of brand distinctiveness. Big win for Bega, huge loss for anyone managing a brand ,
  • Learned

One of these Business Leaders is Not Like Another

Forbes highlights Marc Andreessen as using Twitter the way it was intended. Like a human. And they are right – not just in that Mark is using Twitter well, but that he is using it the right way.

Andreessen is exactly the kind of person who could be excused for not using Twitter like a human. Inhumanly busy? Check. Prominent enough that they could cause a media firestorm with a wrong choice of words? Check. Powerful enough that a tweet could derail multizillion-dollar deals? Check.

And yet, he’s using Twitter the way you wish every person who gets invited to Davos would. He doesn’t just tweet humorous utterances and replies every once in a while. He goes on epic rants (most recently on the NSA). He tells stories. He entertains replies and is seemingly willing to banter with anyone who’s got anything smart to say. He even, o feat of social media savvy, uses the “favorite” option as a way to “like” tweets, which has become all the rage of late.

But it is going to take more that just the business leader changing for others to benefit from this advice. 

First, context is everything. Say you are the CEO of a bank – your business context is very different from that of a Silicon Valley super star. Would you be able to behave in the same way? Simply put, no.

Second, communication needs to be a priorty. Mark has clearly prioritized communicating. Most business leaders don’t. Except through facile emails and videos cooked up by comms teams that would be, for the most part, better off getting out of the way.

Third, Mark’s brand is Mark. Most business leaders struggle with this. Are they the brand – or is the company the brand. In this new world of zero intermediaries I argue it has never been more important for Executives to build their own brands and communicate authentically. Most wont because communicating isnt a priority for them – they favor opacity over transparency (see 2) and if they did, their business context might not allow for it.

Either way, I hope Mark continues what he is doing.

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