Andy on Twitter

  • Leonardo da Vinci's brilliance endures 500 years after his death ,
  • Embarrassed to be an American. Thrilled to be a Kiwi. It's not complete but a start. ,
  • Peeps, looking for a great agency/freelancer in Sydney with deep skills - build campaigns, edms etc in Pardot. Help!,
  • Disagree with this... myopic digital thinking. Miss by Kraft was underinvesting in brand and in some markets sellin… ,
  • Epic morning ,
  • Stunning Queenstown ,
  • Never gets old this view. Always changing with the light and seasons. ,
  • This is a maddening feature of Spotify and one of those moments of dissatisfaction that drives switching. Postal A… ,
  • A really good read... To often I see the value of data as a defensable advantage overstated... The Empty Promise of… ,
  • Brilliant... Choir! Choir! Choir! Epic! Nights: David Byrne + NYC sing HEROES via @YouTube,
  • Good move ... Westpac turns on AI chatbot ,
  • Paul is doing a great job of unpacking marketing trends and news. Worth a read if you are a marketer ,
  • Great read. Underscores how innovation happens in fast moving innovators is so radically different that incumbents.… ,
  • When landing in LAX and getting to terminal takes the equivalent of 70% of the flying time to LAX. Really… ,
  • The quality of questions matters... Good read... ,
  • Connect

Taylor Momsen, Pantless, Obama and Why Words Matter

Words matter. Not just to communicate but also to drive presence. Presence is the new currency is messaging. If you can’t get the right words in and around your message – not matter how good it is – people might not find it in an online, search driven world.

Here, The New York Times, points to how some are taking this to a extreme. Here’s a SnapShot…

The Huffington Post knows its way around search engine optimization, or S.E.O. as it’s known. A story about whether the president would play golf with Rush Limbaugh was headlined: “Obama Rejects Rush Limbaugh Golf Match: Rush ‘Can Play With Himself.’ ” It’s digital nirvana: two highly searched proper nouns followed by a smutty entendre, a headline that both the red and the blue may be compelled to click, and the readers of the site can have a laugh while the headline delivers great visibility out on the Web.

The Huffington Post sometimes tests two different headlines in real time to see which the audience is responding to. (“How to Reduce Your Oil Footprint” did better than “How to Say No to Big Oil and Reduce Your Oil Footprint.” Go figure.) The site also uses its Twitter account to solicit reader suggestions on headlines. Arianna Huffington, editor in chief and a founder of the site, rejects any notion that it is dumbing down in search of eyeballs.

Speak Up — Add Your Thoughts

Connections

  • Connect
How did you connect?   [?]