Andy on Twitter

  • Wow! ,
  • Everytime I have to go back to the world I think "I just wish this company used for everything". ,
  • Every time I am "forced" to use Microsoft software it is nothing but a major disappointment - think the hardware might be ahead of software,
  • RR points to the sad state of the CMO. Succession is the major issue - aside from the turnover itself ,
  • Of to Christchurch. Brrrrrrrrrrr,
  • Stop whining about Facebook and Google and learn from them - spot bloody on! ,
  • Looking forward to reading this ,
  • Worth a read ,
  • Love this... ,
  • Like how McKinsey frames culture and behaviour together. ,
  • Fed Up with Super Rugby games stopages for criminal investigations. Equaly tired of thuggery ,
  • Quarter final super rugby and the stadium looks pretty empty. Sad state of super rugby in AU,
  • Agree with Mark - don't get it. Don't need to be reminded that my sandwich was a beauty chook. ,
  • I just published “The Cannes Conundrum” ,
  • Church in London has a little cafe in the entrance serving Allpress coffee. How good is that. God and coffee to go. ,
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The Google Reader Rant

Ranting on technology is a popular and shared past-time. Once the dust settles, the echo-chamber dials-down, and the crowd points to the solution to whatever has befallen us, its worth reflecting on what actually might have happened.

In cancelling Google Reader – a product I love and use daily — Google might just have done us all a favor. Now, do many of us wish they’d kept the old steam-engine of RSS readers trundling along, for sure. But would it have benefited us in the long-run, no.

  1. Killing an average product makes way for better products — and even opens a door through which those in existence can creep. No longer in Google’s shaddow, they shine. And so, I met Feedly.
  2. Those better products, benefiting from a flock of new users hopefully thrive.
  3. Google can pursue its true intent of being a platform and not a tools company. Google+ is a platform. Facebook is a platform. Reader, yeah, it was good but it was just another tool. In fact, the tool becomes a threat. As Nick says:
  4. “Tools are threats to platforms because they give their owners ways to bypass platforms. If you have a good set of tools, you don’t need a stinking platform. If you’re happy with RSS, you’re a little less likely to sign up for Google+, or Twitter, or Facebook. At the very least, the tool gives you the choice. It grants you self-determination.”

In short, focus benefits the owner as much as the customer. Forget the ranting, embrace the platform and keep reading. The technology industry has an amazing ability to fill the gaps with more innovation – and the innovation is shifting the the platforms.

Speak Up — Add Your Thoughts

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