Andy on Twitter

  • Execsplaining the McSweeny’s “Business Words” – : The Next Generation ,
  • I see the highlanders are still sporting their awful hi-vis safety vest uniforms.,
  • The Machine Stops... ,
  • Reckon abandons battle with rivals MYOB, Xero... thinks it’s because ⁦@Xero⁩ throws money and marketing... ge… ,
  • Germany blocks Facebook from pooling user data without consent. So does this rule apply to every merger? Tough call… ,
  • The nonsense never ends ,
  • Interesting but Marketshare nailed this some years ago... Unilever Is Working on a Cross-Media Measurement Model to… ,
  • While I can’t stand the Super Bowl Ad Mania this move by Yellowtail is interesting in how they’ve got around ABs ca… ,
  • As many as 11,543 Microsoft employees got swept up in a reply-all email apocalypse ... that’s why it should have be… ,
  • Connect

The Makers Schedule

Paul is right – you nee to understand what kid of schedule you are on. More managers though need to get some of the Makers Schedule into their week. Too many confuse being busy with creating value or achieving progress. Thus the Managers Schedule becomes a productivity illusion.

There are two types of schedule, which I’ll call the manager’s schedule and the maker’s schedule. The manager’s schedule is for bosses. It’s embodied in the traditional appointment book, with each day cut into one hour intervals. You can block off several hours for a single task if you need to, but by default you change what you’re doing every hour.

When you use time that way, it’s merely a practical problem to meet with someone. Find an open slot in your schedule, book them, and you’re done.

Most powerful people are on the manager’s schedule. It’s the schedule of command. But there’s another way of using time that’s common among people who make things, like programmers and writers. They generally prefer to use time in units of half a day at least. You can’t write or program well in units of an hour. That’s barely enough time to get started.

When you’re operating on the maker’s schedule, meetings are a disaster. A single meeting can blow a whole afternoon, by breaking it into two pieces each too small to do anything hard in. Plus you have to remember to go to the meeting. That’s no problem for someone on the manager’s schedule. There’s always something coming on the next hour; the only question is what. But when someone on the maker’s schedule has a meeting, they have to think about it.

For someone on the maker’s schedule, having a meeting is like throwing an exception. It doesn’t merely cause you to switch from one task to another; it changes the mode in which you work.

Speak Up — Add Your Thoughts

Connections

  • Connect
How did you connect?   [?]
Indulgences-Coffee